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Top tags: City Officials' Day at the Capitol 

Governor’s message on Coronavirus: Idaho is prepared, do your part to prevent spread

Posted By Payton Grover, Thursday, March 5, 2020

 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 4, 2020

 

Governor’s message on Coronavirus: Idaho is prepared, do your part to prevent spread

 

Boise, Idaho - Governor Brad Little announced today the creation of a new team to assist in Idaho’s preparation for the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

 

Governor Little and public health officials in Idaho have been monitoring and preparing for the coronavirus situation since January when the first case in the United States was confirmed.

 

The Governor’s new Coronavirus Working Group will support Idaho’s public health agencies and increase coordination and communication around the multiple aspects of the planning and response effort.

 

“While the individual risk for coronavirus in Idaho is still low, the situation is rapidly evolving and we do expect confirmed cases in Idaho at some point,” Governor Little said during a press conference today with public health officials. “Idaho is prepared, and we all must do our part to prevent the spread of coronavirus by washing your hands frequently, staying home if you are sick, and avoiding others who are sick.”

 

He also unveiled a new web site – Coronavirus.Idaho.Gov – where the public can find the latest information on Idaho’s situation and the Governor’s new Coronavirus Working Group, resources to learn more about the disease, and contact information for local public health districts, which are the best sources to answer to citizens’ questions.

 

In addition, Governor Little said he is actively working with legislative leaders to make state funds available to aid in the response effort if it is needed.

 

Key facts about coronavirus in Idaho at this time:

 

  • Health officials are focused on slowing the spread of coronavirus to reduce the impact on the healthcare system.

 

  • Current data suggests most healthy adults and children will not get extremely ill from coronavirus, but just like the flu it can be harmful or deadly to older populations and those with underlying health conditions.

 

  • 80 percent of infected individuals experience mild symptoms similar to the cold or flu and a portion are asymptomatic, reinforcing the need to ramp up personal hygiene to prevent spread.

 

  • Health officials are not recommending the cancellation of travel plans or events at this time, but individuals may choose to change plans based on their own comfort level and needs.

 

  • Idaho is fortunate to have a state lab that is fully capable of testing for coronavirus, and privately-run facilities may begin testing soon. Test kits are limited but more resources are expected to arrive from the federal government by the end of the week.

 

# # #

 

NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Marissa Morrison Hyer, Press Secretary

208-943-1686 or marissa.morrison@gov.idaho.gov

 

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New Resources: Negotiating Municipal Franchise Agreements for Community Objectives

Posted By Johanna M. Bell, Monday, March 2, 2020

Recent research by the National Energy Lab Research (NREL) on municipal franchise agreements is now available to help inform AIC member cities' franchise fee negotiations to address a broad range of community infrastructure resiliency goals.

Cities have many options to achieve their community resiliency goals. One emerging trend is for municipalities to incorporate these objectives into their franchise agreements with an electric service provider or to use these agreements as an entry point to negotiate other community resiliency-related agreements with the utility.

To understand this trend, NREL developed a national data set of municipal franchise agreements and is publishing case studies on cities that have incorporated clean energy objectives into their franchise agreements. NREL is also publishing a national assessment of the potential impact of widespread adoption of resiliency and other renewable energy objectives on deployment nationwide.

AIC strongly encourages our members to tune in to the webinar for a comprehensive overview of these opportunities and a few items to consider as they review their franchise agreement options.

Impact of Franchise Agreements
A franchise agreement is a negotiated contract between a municipality and an electric service provider that grants the utility the right to serve customers in the city's jurisdiction. The contract often specifies the period of service and a fee remitted back to the municipality. These agreements commonly include stipulations regarding a utility's right of way to install and maintain electrical infrastructure.

Some cities have incorporated other energy objectives into franchise agreements—or have signed agreements in parallel—that commit the city and utility to work together to achieve joint energy goals. When franchise and related agreements are implemented, the city can deliver a wide variety of outcomes, including additional revenues for city services, installation of underground infrastructure, new renewable energy projects, and more collaborative working relationships between parties.

Municipal Franchise Agreement Data
NREL collected franchise agreement information from 3,538 municipalities nationwide. The data set includes information on the municipality, its franchise authority, the electric service provider, the length of the agreement, the franchise fee, and whether the agreement includes references to specific clean energy objectives, including energy efficiency, renewable energy, street lighting, underground infrastructure, and others (i.e., electric vehicles, reliability, and infrastructure strengthening).

This data is the foundation for NREL's subsequent case study and impact analysis, which will be published soon.

Links to Resources:

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AIC Legislative Update: March 2, 2020

Posted By Justin Ruen, Monday, March 2, 2020

AIC-Opposed Annexation Bill Passes House & Heads to Senate

The House of Representatives passed House Bill 489, the bill sponsored by Rep. Bryan Zollinger, R-Idaho Falls, that would dramatically curtail cities’ ability to annex by a vote of 53-16-1.  The bill now heads to the Senate Local Government & Taxation Committee. 

We ask city officials to please contact Senators and respectfully ask them to oppose House Bill 489.

A summary outlining AIC’s concerns with the bill can be accessed at the link at the bottom of this post (AIC Bullet Points H 489). 

Property Tax Freeze Bill Heads to Senate

If your city has not weighed in on the property tax freeze bill—House Bill 409—we ask that you contact Senators and respectfully ask that they oppose the bill.  The bill passed the House by a vote of 46-23-1.  It is not clear when the bill will be scheduled for a hearing by the Senate Local Government & Taxation Committee.

Revenue Sharing Bill Up for Hearing in Senate Local Government & Taxation Committee Tuesday Afternoon

Rep. Monks’ bill that would change the revenue sharing distribution will be up for a hearing in the Senate Local Government & Taxation Committee on Tuesday, March 3 at 3:00 p.m.  AIC is neutral on the legislation and cities are encouraged to weigh in with members of the committee with their thoughts. 

House Bill 408 would revise the formula for sales tax revenue sharing for cities, merging the current State Distribution and County Distribution.  The bill would establish new quarterly base amounts for Fiscal Year 2020 for each city based on their quarterly revenue sharing distribution, as well as an annual per capita revenue sharing amount based on the previous Fiscal Year’s receipts.  If there is no change in the amount of revenue sharing from the same quarter of the previous Fiscal Year, then cities will receive the same distribution amount.  If the amount of revenue sharing dollars for the current quarter of the Fiscal Year is greater than the amount for the same quarter of the previous Fiscal Year, then cities would receive their quarterly base amount with an increase of up to 1%.  Any revenue over and above the 1% increase would be distributed to cities with a below average per capita distribution in proportion to the population of that city to the population of all cities with a below-average per capita distribution.  If revenue declines below the amount for the same quarter of the previous Fiscal Year, then each city would receive a proportional reduction down to the quarterly base amount, and if further reductions are needed, they would be based on the proportion that the city’s population bears to the population of all cities within the state.

AIC prepared a five year and cumulative analysis of the bill, that shows the effects if the bill had been in place over the last five years.

Senate Passes AIC-Supported Forgone Levying Bill

Legislation requiring cities, counties and other taxing districts to pass an annual resolution to accrue forgone levying authority has passed the House and Senate and is headed to the Governor’s desk. 

House Bill 354 would take effect July 1, 2020 if signed by the Governor, meaning that local governments would need to pass the resolution to accrue forgone for the upcoming Fiscal Year as part of their budgeting process this summer. 

The resolution would need to specify the dollar amount of forgone the city, county or other taxing district wants to accrue, which could be all or part of their forgone amount from that particular Fiscal Year.  The council would pass the resolution at its annual budget hearing after providing public notice (that could be published with the budget hearing notices published twice in the official newspaper at least 7 days apart).  The amount of forgone proposed to be reserved would need to be stated in the hearing notice.

 

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AIC Legislative Update: Feb. 25, 2020

Posted By Justin Ruen, Tuesday, February 25, 2020

House Passes Property Tax Freeze Bill—Please Contact Senators to Ask for their Opposition

Today the House passed the property tax freeze bill—House Bill 409—by a vote of 46-23 after extended debate.  We ask city officials to please contact members of the Senate to respectfully ask that they oppose the bill. 

We appreciate those legislators who voted against House Bill 409 and the House floor votes are provided below.  Please thank legislators who voted against the bill.

House Bill 409: Representatives Voting Yes—Addis, Amador, Anderst, Andrus, Armstrong, Barbieri, Bedke, Blanksma, Boyle, Chaney, Christensen, Collins, Crane, DeMordaunt, Dixon, Ehardt, Furniss, Gestrin, Giddings, Harris, Hartgen, Holtzclaw, Horman, Kauffman, Kingsley, Kiska, Marshall, Mendive, Monks, Moon, Moyle, Nichols, Palmer, Raymond, Remington, Ricks, Scott, Shepherd, Stevenson, Syme, Vander Woude, Wisniewski, Young, Youngblood, Zito, Zollinger.

House Bill 409: Representatives Voting No—Abernathy, Anderson, Berch, Chew, Clow, Davis, Ellis, Gannon, Gibbs, Goesling, Green, Kerby, Lickley, Mason, McCrostie, Necochea, Raybould, Rubel, Smith, Toone, Troy, Wintrow, Wood.

Rep. Lance Clow, R-Twin Falls, said that legislators will have to explain to their constituents that the freeze applies to local government property tax budgets only and that it does not mean that homeowners won’t face higher property tax bills next year.  “For that reason, I can’t support the bill,” Clow said. 

Rep. Ilana Rubel, D-Boise, said that House Bill 409 “will not reduce property taxes for homeowners, but would cause great harm to the services that local governments provide.” 

The Legislature has tools at its disposal to fix rising residential home values in the form of increasing and/or indexing the Homeowner’s Exemption, which was capped by the Legislature at $100,000 a few years ago, and providing additional relief through the Circuit Breaker program that helps low-income homeowners who are elderly, widow(ers), disabled, blind, or disabled veterans or former prisoners of war.

Freezing property taxes will force cities to essentially bring development to a halt, if they are unable to pay for the services and infrastructure needed to serve Idaho’s growing population.  Property taxes pay for vital police and fire services that protect our communities and maintaining our streets and bridges.

AIC-Opposed Annexation Bill Goes to House Floor

The House is expected to vote soon on an AIC-opposed annexation bill sponsored by Rep. Bryan Zollinger, R-Idaho Falls.  AIC urges city officials to contact their legislators and respectfully ask that they oppose House Bill 489, which would have serious impacts on managing growth and infrastructure planning and development at the local level.

“Idaho’s current annexation law was a product of a two-year discussion from 2000 to 2002 that involved broad stakeholder participation and thoughtful compromises that from the basis for the state’s policy,” said AIC Counsel Jerry Mason in testimony to the House Local Government Committee last week.  “House Bill 489 would eliminate that carefully constructed law that has served the state well.”

House Bill 489 has numerous flaws, which were discussed in testimony to the committee.

The bill makes the process more burdensome and time consuming for annexations requested by property owners. 

The bill requires two-thirds of landowners to approve every annexation (regardless of whether they receive city services or not).

By having voting on the basis of landowner approval instead of acreage (as in the current law) HB 489 opens up the possibility for abuse by allowing a potentially unlimited number of co-owners to be brought to frustrate a proposed annexation.

Passing House Bill 489 would result in a patchwork quilt of annexed and unannexed lands, forcing emergency responders to identify which jurisdiction is responsible for responding to calls and crippling cities’ ability to have thoughtfully planned extension of their services and infrastructure.

“Idaho is facing unprecedented growth,” Mason said, “and cities have invested billions of dollars in infrastructure for water, sewer, roads, bridges, parks, and libraries.  To abandon that investment by passing House Bill 489 would be shortsighted.” 

AIC-Opposed Urban Renewal Bill up for Floor Vote Soon in House

Legislation that would restrict the use of urban renewal for economic development will be voted on by the House very soon.  House Bill 484, sponsored by Rep. Mike Moyle, R-Star and Sen. Jim Rice, R-Caldwell, would exempt highway district levies from revenue allocation areas formed or expanded to include property on or after July 1, 2020 and allow the highway district to negotiate an agreement with the agency to waive these rights.  We ask city officials to contact their legislators and respectfully ask that they oppose House Bill 484.

The growth in tax base that happens within an urban renewal district ultimately benefits all the local governments in that area (cities, counties, highway districts, fire districts, library districts, etc.).  House Bill 484 will force urban renewal districts to have a longer lifespan to bring projects to fruition and pay off bonds, which has the perverse impact of forcing local governments to wait longer for new taxable value to hit the tax rolls.  Urban renewal agencies work in close consultation with highway districts now to take their needs into account.  House Bill 484 would hamper a vital tool for economic development and job creation in cities.

Proposed Constitutional Amendment on Property Taxation of Property Leased to Private Entities is Pulled by Sponsor

House Joint Resolution 5, a proposed constitutional amendment that would require state or local government owned property that is leased to private entities to be subject to property taxation encountered headwinds and has been pulled back to the House Revenue & Taxation Committee.  It is not clear whether a new resolution will be introduced this session. 

 

 

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Join Us for Regional Spring District Workshops

Posted By Justin Ruen, Monday, February 24, 2020

AIC will be doing six regional workshops around the state in late April and early May.  You can register via the AIC website.  The cost of the daylong training is $39 per person, which includes lunch. 

The Spring District Workshops will include training on new laws passed by the Idaho Legislature, budgeting and city revenues, and planning and zoning.  

 

 

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AIC Legislative Update: Feb. 24, 2020

Posted By Justin Ruen, Monday, February 24, 2020

Legislators Need to Hear from You on Property Tax Freeze Bill

The House of Representatives approved a unanimous consent request pushing floor debate and vote on the property tax freeze bill—House Bill 409—until Tuesday, February 25.  Stakeholders continue to have discussions behind the scenes about possible alternatives to the freeze. 

Please contact your legislators, and even recontact them, to respectfully ask that they oppose House Bill 409.  You can find your legislators by using this online tool

The bill would freeze city, county and other non-school taxing districts’ property tax budgets for the upcoming Fiscal Year at the dollar amount each entity received for the current Fiscal Year.  The lost revenue would not accrue to a taxing district’s forgone levying authority.

House Bill 409 is premised on the flawed assumption that freezing property taxes will help homeowners in areas with rapidly escalating values.  In testimony to the House Revenue & Taxation Committee, Ada County Clerk Phil McGrane said that if a one-year property tax freeze had been in place in 2019, 82% of residential properties in Ada County would still have seen a tax increase because taxes are shifting from commercial property onto homeowners.  Without the one-year freeze, 91% of residential properties would have seen an increase. 

The Legislature has tools at its disposal to fix rising residential home values in the form of increasing and/or indexing the Homeowner’s Exemption, which was capped by the Legislature at $100,000 a few years ago, and providing additional relief through the Circuit Breaker program that helps low-income homeowners who are elderly, widow(ers), disabled, blind, or disabled veterans or former prisoners of war.

Freezing property taxes will force cities to essentially bring development to a halt, if they are unable to pay for the services and infrastructure needed to serve Idaho’s growing population.  Property taxes pay for vital police and fire services that protect our communities and maintaining our streets and bridges.

Revenue Sharing Bill Passes House Floor

Rep. Monks’ bill to change the revenue sharing formula—House Bill 408—passed the House floor by a vote of 53-16-1.  The bill now heads to the Senate for a committee hearing before the Senate Local Government & Taxation Committee.  AIC is neutral on House Bill 408, but city officials should feel free to contact their legislators and share their city’s position on the legislation.  You can find a spreadsheet showing the impact of the legislation here

AIC-Opposed Annexation Bill Goes to House Floor

On Thursday, the House Local Government Committee voted to approve an AIC-opposed annexation bill sponsored by Rep. Bryan Zollinger, R-Idaho Falls.  House Bill 489 will be up for floor debate and vote in the House next week. 

AIC urges city officials to contact their legislators and respectfully ask that they oppose House Bill 489, which would have serious impacts on managing growth and infrastructure planning and development at the local level.

“Idaho’s current annexation law was a product of a two-year discussion from 2000 to 2002 that involved broad stakeholder participation and thoughtful compromises that from the basis for the state’s policy,” said AIC Counsel Jerry Mason in testimony to the committee.  “House Bill 489 would eliminate that carefully constructed law that has served the state well.”

House Bill 489 has numerous flaws, which were discussed in testimony to the committee.

The bill makes the process more burdensome and time consuming for annexations requested by property owners. 

The bill requires two-thirds of landowners to approve every annexation (regardless of whether they receive city services or not).

By having voting on the basis of landowner approval instead of acreage (as in the current law) HB 489 opens up the possibility for abuse by allowing a potentially unlimited number of co-owners to be brought to frustrate a proposed annexation.

Passing House Bill 489 would result in a patchwork quilt of annexed and unannexed lands, forcing emergency responders to identify which jurisdiction is responsible for responding to calls and crippling cities’ ability to have thoughtfully planned extension of their services and infrastructure.

“Idaho is facing unprecedented growth,” Mason said, “and cities have invested billions of dollars in infrastructure for water, sewer, roads, bridges, parks, and libraries.  To abandon that investment by passing House Bill 489 would be shortsighted.” 

AIC-Opposed Bill on P&Z Notice & Hearing Killed in House Local Government Committee

AIC-opposed legislation making hearings before the Planning & Zoning Commission optional for annexations and rezones was defeated in the House Local Government Committee.  We extend our appreciation to AIC Counsel Jerry Mason for his remarks in opposition to House Bill 450

Constitutional Amendment Requiring Property Taxation of Government Property Leased to Private Entities Up for Consideration on House Floor

A proposed constitutional amendment that would require state or local government owned property that is leased to private entities to be subject to property taxation is up for floor debate and vote in the House after clearing House Revenue & Taxation Committee.  House Joint Resolution 005 is sponsored by Rep. Mike Moyle, R-Star; Rep. John Gannon, D-Boise; and Rep. Steven Harris, R-Meridian.  The resolution also provides that any revenue derived from such taxes must be dedicated to reducing property taxes paid by other taxpayers.  There are a number of situations where cities lease property to private entities, including farmland, airport hangars, golf courses, etc.  If your city has concerns with HJR 005, please reach out to your legislators. 

 

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Northwest Environmental Business Council: PFAS Workshop in Boise

Posted By Johanna M. Bell, Friday, February 21, 2020

Join the Northwest Environmental Business Council (NEBC) in Boise for an in-depth look at PFAS. Hear from environmental professionals, Idaho DEQ and legal experts as they examine the science of PFAS, the evolving legal and policy landscapes, remediation technologies and more.

Speakers will address:

The Science of PFAS
PFAS Law and Litigation
The Regulatory Landscape
Remediation Options
What’s happening in Idaho?

DATE: March 19, 2020

TIME: 8 am to 1 pm

LOCATION: The Grove Hotel

Register HERE

Participants include:

Eric Buer
Senior Hydrogeologist
Farallon Consulting, L.L.C.

Brent Brelje
Principal Engineer
SLR Consulting

Jerri Henry
Drinking Water Protection and Finance Division Administrator
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

John McCorkle, CEP
Principal
SLR Consulting

Michael McCurdy, PE, CHMM
Waste Management and Remediation Division Administrator
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Kevin R. Murray
Partner
Holland & Hart

Mike Murray
Environmental and Resource Management Section Manager
HDR Engineering, Inc.

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AIC Legislative Update: House Committee Approves Property Tax Freeze Bill & Revenue Sharing Bill Up for Hearing

Posted By Justin Ruen, Thursday, February 13, 2020

AIC Legislative Update: House Committee Approves Property Tax Freeze Bill

This morning the House Revenue & Taxation Committee voted to send the property tax freeze bill (House Bill 409) to the House floor with a do pass recommendation.  House Bill 409 will be up for floor debate and vote in the House early next week.    

We ask city officials to contact their legislators and respectfully ask that they oppose House Bill 409.  You can find your legislators and their contact information by using this tool.

The bill would freeze city, county and other non-school taxing districts’ property tax budgets for the upcoming Fiscal Year at the dollar amount each entity received for the current Fiscal Year.  The lost revenue would not accrue to a taxing district’s forgone levying authority.

House Bill 409 is premised on the flawed assumption that freezing property taxes will help homeowners in areas with rapidly escalating values.  In testimony to the committee this morning, Ada County Clerk Phil McGrane said that if a one-year property tax freeze had been in place in 2019, 82% of residential properties in Ada County would still have seen a tax increase because taxes are shifting from commercial property onto homeowners.  Without the one-year freeze, 91% of residential properties would have seen an increase. 

The Legislature has tools at its disposal to fix rising residential home values in the form of increasing and/or indexing the Homeowner’s Exemption, which was capped by the Legislature at $100,000 a few years ago, and providing additional relief through the Circuit Breaker program that helps low-income homeowners who are elderly, widow(ers), disabled, blind, or disabled veterans or former prisoners of war.

Freezing property taxes will force cities to essentially bring development to a halt, if they are unable to pay for the services and infrastructure needed to serve Idaho’s growing population.  Property taxes pay for vital police and fire services that protect our communities and maintaining our streets and bridges.

Revenue Sharing Bill Up for Hearing Friday, Feb. 14 in House Rev & Tax Committee

On Friday, February 14 at 9 a.m. the House Revenue & Taxation Committee will have up for hearing Rep. Monks’ bill to change the revenue sharing formula.  AIC is officially neutral on House Bill 408, but cities should feel free to weigh in with committee members on the bill (link to list of House Revenue & Taxation Committee members—click the link for “MEMBERS” toward the top of the page).  AIC prepared a five year and cumulative analysis of the bill, that shows the effects if the bill had been in place over the last five years (see link at end of this blog post). 

House Bill 408 would revise the formula for sales tax revenue sharing for cities, merging the current State Distribution and County Distribution.  The bill would establish new quarterly base amounts for Fiscal Year 2020 for each city based on their quarterly revenue sharing distribution, as well as an annual per capita revenue sharing amount based on the previous Fiscal Year’s receipts.  If there is no change in the amount of revenue sharing from the same quarter of the previous Fiscal Year, then cities will receive the same distribution amount.  If the amount of revenue sharing dollars for the current quarter of the Fiscal Year is greater than the amount for the same quarter of the previous Fiscal Year, then cities would receive their quarterly base amount with an increase of up to 1%.  Any revenue over and above the 1% increase would be distributed to cities with a below average per capita distribution in proportion to the population of that city to the population of all cities with a below-average per capita distribution.  If revenue declines below the amount for the same quarter of the previous Fiscal Year, then each city would receive a proportional reduction down to the quarterly base amount, and if further reductions are needed, they would be based on the proportion that the city’s population bears to the population of all cities within the state.

 

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Live Webcast - How to Bridge the Broadband Gap: A Conversation with State Leaders - Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Posted By Payton Grover, Friday, February 7, 2020

Though access to high-speed, reliable internet is an increasingly critical tool for modern American life, the Federal Communications Commission estimates that at least 21 million Americans still lack broadband access. Other counts suggest this number could be as high as 162 million. Although much of the conversation about expanding broadband access has focused on the federal and local levels, states are taking decisive steps to expand this critical service to communities that lack it or are underserved.

State leaders have recognized that broadband is not just a technology, but a key asset that will shape other policy priorities: access to health care, economic development, and distance-learning programs, among others. On Feb. 11, The Pew Charitable Trusts will host a day-long event unveiling state practices in five categories that are proving effective for expanding broadband: stakeholder engagement, policy framework, planning and capacity building, funding and operations, and program evaluation and evolution.

The Pew Charitable Trust will be hosting a Live Webcast  How to Bridge the Broadband Gap: A Conversation with State Leaders  Tuesday, February 11, 2020.  The webcast will run from 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM  MST.  Presenters will include broadband experts from Pew and broadband leaders from across the country who will be sharing best practices for deploying broadband into under served areas.  The webcast is free. 

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2020 Southwest Idaho Ground Water Quality Forum: February 19, 2020

Posted By Johanna M. Bell, Thursday, February 6, 2020

Ada County, in partnership with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Planning Association (APA) Idaho Chapter, is hosting a ground water quality forum. The forum will cover current ground water topics and include a facilitated discussion on ground water contamination and protection.


The forum will educate participants on the following topics:

·        The health impacts of ground water contamination

·        The extent of the problem in our region

·        Potential sources of contamination

·        The importance of source water protection

·        Actionable solutions to address contamination and protect source water

Barber Park Education and Event Center. Photo provided by Ada County, 201

Engage with fellow decision-makers and stakeholders from across Idaho, share insights, develop partnerships, and initiate dialogues about ground water quality and source water protection!

 

A link to the Registration can be found HERE.

 

IDEQ Staff Contact: Rachael Smith; Rachael.Smith@deq.idaho.gov; (208) 373-0249

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